Make Your Own Humidity Chamber for Rolled Documents or Comics!

How To Flatten Folded Or Rolled PaDer Documents

Paper records such as maps, newspapers,  and documents that have been rolled or folded for long periods of time often may be safely flattened using carefully controlled humidification.

According to the National Park Service, “Paper records such as maps, newspapers, and documents that have been rolled or folded for long periods of time often may be safely flattened using carefully controlled humidification. ”  What does this mean?  That means not all books will benefit from this procedure.  Use this as a guide on determining whether a book or document will benefit from this procedure.  Do not do this procedure on a brand new modern age comic book.

THREE STEPS TO HUMIDIFICATION
“There are three basic steps to humidification: cleaning, humidifying, and weighting or flattening.   Each step requires somewhat specialized equipment that can be easily constructed from materials gathered from common sources, such as hardware and fabric stores.”

CLEANING FIRST
“It is important to remember that any dirt on the surface of the paper may become muddy during humidification and will set further into the paper fibers. This will make the paper difficult if not impossible to clean in the future. The surface of the paper should at least be swept with a soft, natural fiber brush before humidification. If the papers are heavily soiled, consult a paper conservator about surface cleaning before proceeding.”  Use tips on this guide using Absorene.

“Before proceeding with humidification, remove fasteners such as clips, staples, brads, and rubber bands. “

INSPECTION PROCESS
“Extreme care must be used when initially opening papers that have been folded or rolled. While some papers remain supple over time, others may grow increasingly fragile due to inherent  weaknesses, widely fluctuating temperature and relative humidity, or exposure to light and/or to chemicals in the atmosphere. As a result, paper remembers creases, folds, and curls. If records are not flattened carefully, they may crumble and their valuable information will be irretrievably lost.  Never attempt to open a rolled or folded piece of paper if you are uncertain of its physical condition,  particularly if the climate is extremely dry (less than 35% relative humidity).”

SOURCE: https://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/conserveogram/13-02.pdf

STAPLES AND RUST
So with that in mind, you really should remove the steel staples from the comic book.  With that disclaimer stated, we are not going to remove the staples from the comic book.  We are attempting to make improvements, not restorations.   Since the duration time period will be only 30 minutes, I do not believe that is long enough for iron oxidation to set in on a staple that currently shows no signs of rust.  Scientifically, and depending on your climate conditions, it’s more realistic to assume light rust would begin to set in at the microscopic level within 2 days.  Steel can start to corrode (microscopically) immediately upon exposure to the elements.  Since we are leaving the comic book in for 1-2 hours, it’s probably not going to cause rust.  The heat press will absorb the humidity moisture and dampness of the book within minutes before rust can take proceed.

SHOPPING LIST
Head to Home Depot or Lowe’s Home Improvement Stores and I’ll show you how to make your own moisture chamber for restoring or flattening rolled documents, posters, and comic books!

by KaptainMyke

You will need:

  1. One 40 quart plastic storage tub
  2. Five 4″ pvc plumbing pipe connectors to use as spacers
  3. One roll of Fiberglass or nylon window screen
  4. One Weber deluxe grilling pan
  5. One gallon of distilled water
  6. Timer
  7. Eyeballs
  8. Comic book that needs humidity or moisture treatment for pressing.  Not all comics benefit from this chamber.  Golden Age, Silver Age, Bronze Age benefit the most.  I would not place modern comics in this chamber.
  9. Experience through trial and error
  10. Something heavy to place on top of lid like a bag of charcoal or dog food.  I use another storage tub full of supplies as a weight for the lid.
  11. Silicone Release Paper
  12. Cooking pot for boiling distilled water on stove top
  13. Kitchen stove top for boiling water

See the following photos as an example to make your very own $50 hydration humidity chamber!

Dry Cleaning FIRST, then MOISTURE before PRESS
It is important to remember that any dirt on the surface of the paper may become muddy during humidification and will set further into the paper fibers. This will make the paper difficult if not impossible to clean in the future. The surface of the paper should at least be swept with a soft, natural fiber brush before humidification. If the papers are heavily soiled, consult a paper conservator about surface cleaning before proceeding.

Before proceeding with humidification, remove fasteners such as clips, staples, brads, and rubber bands. “

SOURCE: https://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/conserveogram/13-02.pdf

DRY CLEAN + STAIN REMOVAL OF DOCUMENT OR COMIC BOOK FIRST
Inspect the book or document first and lift any folded over creases and flaps.  Lightly dust off and wipe the surface clean lightly with a lotion free Kleenex or dust cloth.  Be sure to dry clean your book or document with Absorene and other materials mentioned in this guide.

BOIL 1 POT OF DISTILLED WATER ON STOVE TOP FOR STEAM
Make sure you have 1 half gallon of room temperature distilled water.  Pour this into your empty chamber storage container.  Allow a pot of distilled water to boil on stove top for 15-20 minutes.  Pour the steaming hot boiling water from pot into bottom of container filled with 1 half gallon of room temperature distilled water.  This is your steam.

TIME DURATION OF BOOKS INSIDE CHAMBER
15-30 minutes with steam is probably ideal for most books.  Keep it to a minimum and start slowly.  Too much moisture can and will ruin a book!  Older books that are brittle can be left inside the chamber for a longer duration, depending on the conditions of the climate in your region where you reside.

PRESS COMIC BOOK OR DOCUMENT INSIDE HIGH HEAT PRESS
Begin to press the book or document for the first time at 150 degrees for 5-7 minutes on front side up with two sheets of silicone release paper above and below the comic book.  After the initial 15 minutes, replace the 2 sheets of silicone release paper and flip the book over, rear cover side up.  Turn off the press.  Cool down the book for 1-2 hours.  Replace the sheets now with one sheet above and below the book and proceed to press as normal.  150 degrees on one side for 5 minutes, flip the book and repeat.  Turn off press with the heat off.  Leave book in press as heat exchange cools down.  Cool down book for 12-24 hours or more for final press.

PHOTO STEP-BY-STEP BUILDING OF YOUR HUMIDITY CHAMBER
This method is recommended over using a Conair clothes humidifier steam gun.  It’s safer, too!

One 40 quart plastic storage tub

One 40 quart plastic storage tub

One 40 quart plastic storage tub

One 40 quart plastic storage tub

Five 4" pvc plumbing pipe connectors to use as spacers

Five 4″ pvc plumbing pipe connectors to use as spacers

One roll of Fiberglass or nylon window screen

One roll of Fiberglass or nylon window screen

One roll of Fiberglass or nylon window screen

One roll of Fiberglass or nylon window screen

One Weber deluxe grilling pan

One Weber deluxe grilling pan. You can probably find any grille surface but be mindful of divets or ripples in your books. Less surface area is better. Do not use a wire grille!

Five 4" pvc plumbing pipe connectors to use as spacers

Place the five 4″ pvc plumbing pipe connectors to use as spacers in the bottom of the storage tub.

Weber deluxe grilling pan.

Set your Weber deluxe grilling pan on top of the pvc pipe spacers. This keeps your book away from water directly.

Fiberglass or nylon window screen

Set your Fiberglass or nylon window screen on top of the grille surface as a barrier from the metal rack and your comic book. This will allow your book to breathe better.

Fiberglass or nylon window screen

Place a second set of Fiberglass or nylon window screen above your book, so that there is 2 screens below and 2 screens above your book. This also helps push the book down gently without using extra weight.

One 40 quart plastic storage tub

Pour 1 half gallon of distilled water into the bottom of the chamber.
Close the lid on the storage tub with your book inside.

Distilled water

Pour 1 half gallon of distilled water into the bottom of the chamber.
Close the lid on the storage tub with your book inside.

Distilled water

Pour 1 half gallon of distilled water into the bottom of the chamber.
Close the lid on the storage tub with your book inside.

distilled water

Pour 1 half gallon of distilled water into the bottom of the chamber.
Close the lid on the storage tub with your book inside.

You should see condensation or humidity start to take place inside the chamber.

You should see condensation or humidity start to take place inside the chamber.

Wait 1-2 hours.

Wait 15-30 minutes. Keep checking on the book to make sure nothing has moved or slid out of place.

Fogging up!

Wait 15-30 minutes. Keep checking on the book to make sure nothing has moved or slid out of place.

After 2 hours remove book.

After 15-30 minutes remove book. This book was left inside over night as an initial test. I would recommend 15 minutes to be safe.  Do not leave your books in overnight.  Period.

Book should feel heavy and feel damp but not soaked.

Book should feel damp but not soaked.  This book was left inside over night as an initial test. I would recommend 15-30 minutes to be safe.

Book should feel heavy and feel damp but not soaked.

Book should feel damp but not soaked.

Book should feel heavy and feel damp but not soaked.

Book should feel damp but not soaked.

Book should feel heavy and feel damp but not soaked.

Book should feel damp but not soaked.

This piece of paper was lifted after the first pressing of the damp book.

This piece of copy paper was lifted after the first pressing of the damp book.  It seemed to lift a lot of loose oil and staining but did not lift any ink or line art.  2 hours later it was completely dry and white again with no trace of designs from the comic book.

After 2 presses this book is completely dry and brighter and whiter than before.

After 2 presses this book is completely dry and brighter and whiter than before.

After 2 presses this book is completely dry and brighter and whiter than before.

After 2 presses this book is completely dry and brighter and whiter than before.

After 2 presses this book is completely dry and brighter and whiter than before.

After 2 presses this book is completely dry and brighter and whiter than before.

 

HOW TO PROPERLY SUBMIT COMIC BOOKS THROUGH THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE MAIL

HOW TO PROPERLY SUBMIT COMIC BOOKS THROUGH THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE MAIL

Greetings! I’m here today to help prevent your beloved comic books from getting damaged in the mail. This will also help you to be a better ebay seller, too if you are one of “those” people. These are strict recommendations if you are submitting books to me directly.

This is the exact way I submit books to CBCS or CGC or my convention facilitator.

I will provide links to everything I have purchased on ebay. Always buy your shipping supplies on ebay. It’s the cheapeast and quickest way to ship your books. Trust me.

You will need:

5lb. Weighmax Mail Scale
Clear Shipping Tape Rolls
Shipping Tape Gun
BCW Comic Book Backer Boards
BCW Silver Age Bags
1″ Blue Painter’s tape (skinny roll)
Fragile Shipping Tape
Knife
Sharpie Marker
Computer with a Printer for Printing a USPS Label

You will also need boxes and jiffy mailers. For comics you can use 12x12x4 boxes which are cheaper via USPS because they are under 12″. Graded books should be shipped the same way but inside a 14x14x4 box instead.

Gemini II Comic Book Mailers
12x12x1 Boxes
14x14x4 Boxes
Styrofoam Packing Peanuts

 

Now that you have your supplies and for super cheap on ebay…you’re on your way to buying and selling comic books through the mail. Let’s begin, shall we?

Today we are going to mail SPAWN #9 to myself. The first appearance of Angela, Thor’s sister! Place your comic book carefully inside a mylite2 with fullback (preferred) or use BCW silver age bag and boards.

Fold up the Gemini II comic mailer along the perforated edges for the comic book. You can safely ship up to 10 books this way, alternating spines along the staple line. Be sure to use a yard stick or ruler to pre-fold out your lines or you will damage your spines.

Place the comic book(s) face down. You are going to place strips of blue painters tape along the sides. Do not be a “Jerry Smith” and put blue tape over the scotch tape on top flap.

Place 1 strip of tape on each side as pictured below:

If you are super worried about sharp corners and razor sharp sides (attempting to obtain a 9.8 or higher grade) you should definitely tape the corners at a diagonal was well. See below:

Carefully fold over your flaps, checking slowly that there is no bend to the comic book. See method below as pictured:

3 (Three) peices of tape when it’s all closed up carefully. 2 along the top and bottom flap edges and one for good measure in the centerline. See pictured:

Back of Gemini II Mailer. You can see the top and bottom tape flaps over side.

Print your name clearly in black sharpie. Write your email address. Write your phone number too in case there is a problem. Also you should write out the name of the comic book title(s) and issue #. Write clearly and legibly. You are not a doctor.

Okay now set that aside somewhere. Somewhere safe from children, coffee, mountain dew, or anything else might sprinkle on it. We are going to build a box! Get ready. It’s hard. Let’s make sure that box survives the USPS. Use 3-4 pieces on the bottom outer flaps. Use tape to tape in inside bottom flap too.

On the sides, I’ve seen boxes get blown out from stress or other boxes on top. Use tape on that corner seam that’s merely glued. Tape the inside too. Don’t be lazy. Go beyond what’s necessary. After all, you just bought like 25 rolls of clear packing tape, right? Okay then, tape away!

So now I’m going to show you the inside of the box to re-iterate what I was stressing about the corner seam of these boxes. Tape away with all that extra tape, brah.

Sprinkle some magical fairy dust otherwise known as styrofoam peanuts in the bottom of the box, only enough to where you can’t see the bottom. Shipping peanuts is fun to give, but never to receive. So you have that going for you, right?

Place your books with the writing side up and place some remaining packing peanuts on top of the comic. Only enough to which you still have a half inch to an inch of space between the top of the box and the top of the layer of peanuts. You do not want to crush your books with the box flaps because you overstuffed the box with peanuts!

Now you are ready to seal the box up. Place fragile stickers/tape on the corners and bottom of the box. Print out your USPS shipping label from the USPS website and affix it to the top of the box.

Bottom of box:

You have now packaged a box of comics inside a box to be shipped out. Congrats! See? Wasn’t that easy? I hope this guide helps you as it has helped me over the years. I have been selling on ebay since 2010 and I learned slowly over time all of these tips. I’m here to share them all with you on this page.  I’ve had 2 boxes damaged in 10 years.  Pretty good odds!

Thank you!

How to Press Comic Books

I have decided to try and dive into the subculture and rabbit hole known as comic book pressing.   I decided to invest in a  professional grade t-shirt heatpress machine for this adventure. It makes perfect sense because KaptainMyke is already in the business of t-shirt designs and heatpressing silkscreen art.

Edit 9/17/2017 :  Now you can learn and try to press comic books yourself at home! Read my FAQ How to Press Comic Books with a T-Shirt Press by KaptainMyke.

Where to begin? I’ve read and seen countless examples of bad pressing. Scorched books, waves or ripples appear on the comic book several hours or days later. Many times the comic book returns back to its original shape before pressing – like a memory foam mattress!   I am not here to endorse amateur pressing but I am posting here my findings and experiences so far.   Temperature and moisture levels are key.   So what is one to do when water or moisture is paper product’s worst enemy?

I thought I would try the realm of singular heat/cold exchange on pressing. You press a book for 20 minutes, flip the book over for an additional 20 minutes, and turn off the unit…leaving the book inside the press for 4 hours after. This proved to be wildly successful…so here goes my photo documented results with my very first press.

I used one of my son’s new comic books. It’s a brand new Newsstand Edition copy of Scooby Doo Team-up #27, featuring Plastic Man. This comic book is rough! My son is 10 years old and autistic, so he frankly does not care at all what happens to the book, so long as the book is opened to the page he likes the most, and on the floor for him to look at anytime in any random moment of his choosing to admire.

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and creased front corner. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and creased front corner. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and creased front corner. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and creased front corner. Yikes!

I regret I didn’t take enough photos of the back but here are a few good angles for you to inspect:

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and waves on the back cover. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and waves on the back cover. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and waves on the back cover. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and waves on the back cover. Yikes!

I used 2 sheets of normal copy paper on top and below the comic book inside the heat press.

I used 2 sheets of normal copy paper on top and below the comic book inside the heat press.

I used 2 sheets of normal copy paper on top and below the comic book inside the heat press.

I used 2 sheets of normal copy paper on top and below the comic book inside the heat press.

I tried an initial temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit for 20 minutes on each side. This seems to be the best temperature but today I am trying 170 degrees.

The trick is to turn off the heat press after the second 20 minutes and leave the comic book inside the heat press for an additional 1-4 hours, depending on the severity of the the initial creasing and waviness of of the book. Leaving the book in the press is crucial if you do not wish to use a sinus cold or clothes fabric humidifier. I do not suggest using humidity on the book. It’s called a “dry press” and “dry cleaning” for a reason. Leaving the book in the press for as long as possible will prevent the book from returning to its original “memory foam mattress” condition.

After 4 hours later, here are the results of the first comic book pressing by KaptainMyke:

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of back cover.

Results of 1st comic press. Front of cover. You can see the crease on the bottom right corner to see it's the same book.

Results of 1st comic press. Front of cover. You can see the crease on the bottom right corner to see it’s the same book.

Results of 1st comic press. Top down left side view of front of book.

Results of 1st comic press. Top down left side view of front of book.

Spine results of first press. You can obviously see the color breaking spine ticks but overall previous damage of spine is nonexistent.

Spine results of first press. You can obviously see the color breaking spine ticks but overall previous damage of spine is nonexistent.

Bottom right front corner of book shows the color breaking corner crease but it is flattened out very smooth and flat.

Bottom right front corner of book shows the color breaking corner crease but it is flattened out very smooth and flat.

Results of first press. Back of book. No damage.

Results of first press. Back of book. No damage.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down left side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down left side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down right side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down right side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down right side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down right side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of front cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of front cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top right side of front cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top right side of front cover.

As you can clearly see, for my first trial run of dry heat pressing a comic book, the results are wildly remarkable and astounding.  Total success!  There are a few remaining dings but for my first press this is fantastic.

A few things I’ve learned:
Use copy paper on the top and back of cover for pressing.
Pages with glossy magazine paper will stick together when temp is too hot.
When this happens, wait for book to completely cool down before separating out pages stuck due to modern high gloss paper.
Do not press books with a square bound spine, such as graphic novels like The Dark Knight Returns or The Killing Joke.
Spine rolls are not a problem. The press easily resets spine rolls but you will have color breaks most likely.

The name of the heat press is a VEVOR Digital Controller heatpress machine. Model CP230B. Temperature can be adjusted from 100-400 degrees.  Brand new they can retail for $250-$400.  Used you can buy one for $150 but you will need a new bottom pad most likely.

EDIT:  So CBCS comics suspended my account for 7 days and deleted my post on the forum at forum.cbcscomics.com.  

I guess free information exchange isn’t allowed.   I was also not aware this was against company forum policy since they have not updated their terms of use.  

Amateur pressing should not threaten their business model.  The fascists who operate the discussion forum do, however.   

 

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

Here are the results of some more books I’ve recently worked on. I performed a sort of dry cleaning and dry heat pressing on the following books:

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. This one is beat up and has bad spine creasing with color breaks. Before heat pressing.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. This one is beat up and has bad spine creasing with color breaks. Before heat pressing.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. This one is beat up and has bad spine creasing with color breaks. Before heat pressing.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. This one is beat up and has bad spine creasing with color breaks. Before heat pressing.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

Next I tried a cheap newsstand edition of Supergirl from 1994. This one had bad wrinkles and wave in it throughout the entire book. Looks like moisture possibly hit the book. Here are the results:

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

So now, you can learn and try to press comic books yourself at home! Read my FAQ How to Press Comic Books with a T-Shirt Press by KaptainMyke.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

2015 IDW Publishing Back to the Future #1 ZBOX Variant Cast Signed CGC 9.8

2015 IDW Publishing Back to the Future #1
ZBOX Variant Exclusive cover by Doug Chiang
The “Grays Almanac Cover”
Released on 10/20/2015, the same day Marty, Doc, and Jennifer travelled to the future in BTTF II
Cast Signed witnessed signatures
White Pages
CGC Graded Signature Series 9.8 #1504938002

Signed by Michael J Fox on 1/20/16
Signed by Christopher Lloyd on 6/4/2016
Signed by Lea Thompson on 6/4/2016
Signed by Thomas F Wilson on 1/7/17

The only way to obtain this extremely hard to find variant was to be a subscribing member of zbox for the month of OCT 2015, have the code on the card for the comic, and receive it safely in the mail from ZBOX.  I find this book to be extremely culturally significant and the hands that touched it.  One of the best trilogies ever made, hands down.  Thank you to those who made these films happen.  Bravo!

I am hoping to obtain signatures from:
Flea, Billy Zane, Elizabeth Shue, Bob Gale, and Robert Zemekis, and Stephen Spielberg.

If you guys or their managers are reading this, please sign these books if you ever meet my guy Matt from Trinity Comics Convention Facilitator Services.

1988 OFFICIAL TMNT NINJA TURTLE FORCE FAN CLUB KIT FOR SALE ON EBAY

1988 OFFICIAL TMNT NINJA TURTLE FORCE FAN CLUB KIT Complete

This was the original fan club you would receive if mailed in the fan club form only offered in the original 1988 release rubber soft head Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from either Donatello, Michaelangelo, Raphael, or Leonardo. This is a complete yet opened fan club kit, serial number #3390.

This was the original fan club you would receive if mailed in the fan club form only offered in the original 1988 release rubber soft head Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from either Donatello, Michaelangelo, Raphael, or Leonardo.
This is a complete yet opened fan club kit, serial number #3390.

This was the original fan club you would receive if mailed in the fan club form only offered in the original 1988 release rubber soft head Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from either Donatello, Michaelangelo, Raphael, or Leonardo.  This is a complete yet opened fan club kit, serial number #3390.

Includes the following in the Fan Club:

Welcome Letter
Limited Edition mini TMNT comic book (Street Collector’s Edition #1 – raw ungraded)
4″ Yellow “Mutant Power” color TMNT sticker
Official Turtle Force Wall Certificate and Membership card #3390
Royal Blue “Heroes in a half shell” Eastman and Laird art
22″ x 22″ TMNT bandanna
original packet mailing envelope with original owner address
label

Contents of the Turtle Force Fan Club Kit found inside the mailing envelope.

Contents of the Turtle Force Fan Club Kit found inside the mailing envelope.

It was anecdotally decided it was random which color bandanna you would receive in the mail, and not based off which fan club form turtle you sent in. The most common colors found to this date are red and orange. Blue is considered more rare. You could even send in an additional $3 for each additional bandana for a friend with your fan club form!

I have digitally blurred out the address and name on the address label on front of envelope for this listing due to privacy of the original owner.

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