Collecting High Grade Newsstand Editions for Investing in Comics

Remember when you could go to the grocery store or pharmacy with mom and get a comic book?  You could even go to these ancient bookstores called Waldenbooks or B. Dalton Booksellers and could buy a comic book off the spinner rack!   That was a long time ago.  If you are a comic book collector now, in 2017, you buy your comic books on ebay, an online retailer, or even at a local comic store. In almost 30 years, this is what happened to newsstand edition comic books:

Newsstand Editions vs Direct Editions from Comic Retailers

Newsstand Editions vs Direct Editions from Comic Retailers (Old Chart)

Because of all of this, I would be mindful and watchful for any 1992 or newer newsstand edition comic books that feature a UPC bar code on the covers – especially if they are high grade. Specifically, any comics that are in a grade of 9.4 or higher and newsstand edition are selling for significantly more money than regular market value. Examples include Batman Adventures 12 Newsstand Edition, and any other modern day key issue book:

1993 DC Comics BATMAN ADVENTURES #12 Newsstand Ed. CBCS 9.4

1993 DC Comics BATMAN ADVENTURES #12 Newsstand Ed. CBCS 9.4

For earlier titles, there are exceptions to the rule. Some comics have the bar code on the back, like Marvel Comics Presents #72.   Any books post 2002 would have a UPC barcode on them no matter what now, but the difference is they all state “DIRECT EDITION”. You are looking for 2002 and newer comic books that have UPC Barcodes that do not show the words “DIRECT EDITION” in bold letters above or below the bar code.

Okay I broke down some maths. Let’s look at Image Comics Spawn #1 by Todd McFarlane.

1992 Image Comics Spawn #1 by Todd McFarlane

1992 Image Comics Spawn #1 by Todd McFarlane

That’s a very publicly well known number having a 1.7 million copy print run in 1992. 15% of comics in 1992 were allegedly newsstand. 225,000 (1/4 million copies) I estimated the newsstand edition to be a 1:1000 ration of rarity. So 1:1000 is not accurate, that was hand grenade accurate. 32 is more accurate. I think it’s even more accurate to say it’s a 3:100. Or, 30 in 1000, if you will. That’s still a very low number. Still rare. But not even a 1:100.

In summary, here’s what you need to know about High Grade Newsstand Collecting for Investing:

  • High grade. 9.4 or higher is ideal. Pressing services for comic books helps greatly!
  • The years for comics in 1972-1990 doesn’t really matter. It was a 50/50 ratio split in distribution of direct editions over newsstand editions.
  • Search for comic books from the years 1990-2001 with UPC bar codes on cover.
  • Search for comics from the years 2002-2017 with bar codes that do not say “DIRECT EDITION”.
  • Newsstand Edition error or recalled books are also wise investments.

You can experiment with this with your own Spawn #1 Newsstand search terms on ebay.  Try it!  This is the new hunt, people!  Have fun! The only place where I can find modern day 2016-2017 newsstand edition comic books is:

  1. Barnes and Nobles bookstores
  2. Books-a-Million bookstores
  3. Wal-mart
  4. Toys R’ Us

Good luck!

Marvel ended it’s newsstand marketplace in 2013.  2017 was the final year for DC Comics newsstand comics.   As of 2018, both have now since discontinued their newsstand marketplace to retailers nationwide.  A handful of comic book publishers still sell to newsstands, but mostly Marvel magazines and Archie comics.  I have updated the chart for a better visual of what’s happened to the market today.  Comic Book Grading Companies should distinguish the differences on their labels.  Specifically, after 2001.

Newsstand Editions vs Direct Editions from Comic Retailers by year and percentage.

Newsstand Editions vs Direct Editions from Comic Retailers by year and percentage.

 

Here are some examples of high grade newsstand edition rare covers of J Scott Campbell with his run on Amazing Spider-man. This is some of his earlier work, too:

Amazing Spider-man 476 Newsstand Edition Cover art by J Scott Campbell

Amazing Spider-man 476 Newsstand Edition Cover art by J Scott Campbell

Amazing Spider-man 492 Newsstand Edition Cover art by J Scott Campbell

Amazing Spider-man 492 Newsstand Edition Cover art by J Scott Campbell

Amazing Spider-man 493 Newsstand Edition Cover art by J Scott Campbell

Amazing Spider-man 493 Newsstand Edition Cover art by J Scott Campbell-newsie-001

Amazing Spider-man 601 Newsstand Edition Cover art by J Scott Campbell Very rare

Amazing Spider-man 601 Newsstand Edition Cover art by J Scott Campbell with rare $3.99 cover price.

1991 Marvel Comics Marvel Comics Presents #72 High Grade Newsstand Edition, 9.4 1st Weapon X, origin, etc UPC Bar code is on the back of cover, unlike most newsstand editions from 1991.

1991 Marvel Comics Marvel Comics Presents #72 High Grade Newsstand Edition, 9.4 1st Weapon X, origin, etc UPC Bar code is on the back of cover, unlike most newsstand editions from 1991.

1991 Marvel Comics Marvel Comics Presents #72 High Grade Newsstand Edition, 9.4 1st Weapon X, origin, etc UPC Bar code is on the back of cover, unlike most newsstand editions from 1991.

1991 Marvel Comics Marvel Comics Presents #72 High Grade Newsstand Edition, 9.4 1st Weapon X, origin, etc UPC Bar code is on the back of cover, unlike most newsstand editions from 1991.

The Secret to Obtaining Expensive “Low Print Run” Comic Book Variants for CHEAP

KRS COMICS EXCLUSIVE: LIMITED TO 1000 COPIES CON EXCLUSIVE: ONLY 150 AVAIL ONLINE ON KRSCOMICS.COM

2018 Marvel Comics VENOM #1 reboot Mike Mayhew Variant KRS COMICS EXCLUSIVE: LIMITED TO 1000 COPIES
CON EXCLUSIVE: ONLY 150 AVAIL ONLINE ON KRSCOMICS.COM

The Secret to Obtaining Low Print Run Expensive Comic Book Variants for CHEAP

by KaptainMyke

This discussion popped up on the CBCS discussion forums today.  Many have asked how to obtain the newest Mattina Metal Virgin Variants and not pay the ridiculous $300 price tag on ebay.

Welcome to the new form of ticketmaster and stubhub!  Instead of concert tickets it’s comic books.  The real secret is to have “liked” their facebook page, and sign up for accounts with:

www.asseenonadultswim.com
The Aspen Store
braintrustcomics.com
The Nerd Store
kevineastmanstudios
Golden Apple Comics

Scorpion Comics
thecomicmint
ComicsExposure
www.7ate9comics.com
Sad Lemon Comics (UK)
Frankie’s Comics

unknowncomics.com
krscomics.com
Jetpack Comics
Midtown Comics
jscottcampbell.com
Marc Ellerby, (UK) (Rick and Morty)
and Tony Moore  websites, etc and so on.

This is just a fraction of what’s out there.  Google your favorite artist or comic book store online.  Sign up for an account and be sure to subscribe to their newsletters or emails.  When you get an email that a pre-sale is happening, hypothetically say, Saturday at 9am EST time zone, you should set your calendar 10 MINUTES EARLY and log into your account.  Go to the page you want to buy the book from, and be sure to sort at the top of results “New to old” and be one of those people hitting refresh every 2 seconds buying that store exclusive 3 pack featuring a B&W Variant, Trade Dress Variant, and Virgin Variant all for just a mere $75 while everyone else is stuck paying $300 for the Virgin variant art and $100 for the trade dress version.

With today’s modern variant trend continuing, it’s also smarter to go ahead and buy the CGC 9.8 prescreened and guaranteed graded slabbed pre-orders.  Any variant over $50 is worth the extra $25 to get a 9.8 guarantee.

 

Tips for Selling Items on Ebay Auctions

 

1. Schedule to end on a Sunday night
2. Schedule to end at 6pm PST or 9pm EST
3. Schedule to end around the 1st of the month for maximum payday profit
4. Space multiple auctions end times out over 3-5 minute intervals apart
5. Start at 99 cents
6. Use a reserve but only if the item is too rare or hard to find that people don’t know of its existence
7. Free shipping inside US, global shipping program outside US
8. Clear concise well lit photos, not blurry or cropped out
9. No reflections of faces, naked body parts, or evidence of a crime
10. Use sensationalism words like: “WOW!”, “RARE”, “HTF”, “LOOK!”, “SEXY”, “AMAZING” in your description and titles (it works for fruit and vegetables)

Selling on ebay can be fun and rewarding as a buyer and a seller.  Want to sell comic books or toys on ebay?  First of all, buy all shipping supplies on ebay:

You will also need boxes and cardboard gemini media mailers. For comics you can use 12x12x4 boxes which are cheaper via USPS because they are under 12″. Graded books should be shipped the same way but inside a 14x14x4 box instead.

You should know that from January to March it is a buyers market and not a good time to sell.  From April through the summertime, it is a great time to be a seller and not so much as a buyer.  Keep this in mind when selling collectibles or luxury purchase items on ebay.

Learn how to properly mail your ebay packages through the US Postal Service System at this link.

And, if you sell comic books on ebay, it should be required by law to purchase this book:

There are far too many sellers on ebay who overgrade their books on auction items. This causes people to overbid or bid aggressively on a FINE copy of a golden age horror book but ends up being a VERY GOOD condition comic book due to a tear or piece of tape. The Overstreet Guide to Grading Comic Books is written by Robert M. Overstreet. This book will greatly detail and cite examples with images on each grade of the ten point comic book grading system. This book is incredibly valuable to any buyer or seller on ebay of comics. You also can use this book to argue with a seller on why you justify that a book is graded less than advertised by a seller.

HOW TO PROPERLY SUBMIT COMIC BOOKS THROUGH THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE MAIL

HOW TO PROPERLY SUBMIT COMIC BOOKS THROUGH THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE MAIL

Greetings! I’m here today to help prevent your beloved comic books from getting damaged in the mail. This will also help you to be a better ebay seller, too if you are one of “those” people. These are strict recommendations if you are submitting books to me directly.

This is the exact way I submit books to CBCS or CGC or my convention facilitator.

I will provide links to everything I have purchased on ebay. Always buy your shipping supplies on ebay. It’s the cheapeast and quickest way to ship your books. Trust me.

You will need:

5lb. Weighmax Mail Scale
Clear Shipping Tape Rolls
Shipping Tape Gun
BCW Comic Book Backer Boards
BCW Silver Age Bags
1″ Blue Painter’s tape (skinny roll)
Fragile Shipping Tape
Knife
Sharpie Marker
Computer with a Printer for Printing a USPS Label

You will also need boxes and jiffy mailers. For comics you can use 12x12x4 boxes which are cheaper via USPS because they are under 12″. Graded books should be shipped the same way but inside a 14x14x4 box instead.

Gemini II Comic Book Mailers
12x12x1 Boxes
14x14x4 Boxes
Styrofoam Packing Peanuts

 

Now that you have your supplies and for super cheap on ebay…you’re on your way to buying and selling comic books through the mail. Let’s begin, shall we?

Today we are going to mail SPAWN #9 to myself. The first appearance of Angela, Thor’s sister! Place your comic book carefully inside a mylite2 with fullback (preferred) or use BCW silver age bag and boards.

Fold up the Gemini II comic mailer along the perforated edges for the comic book. You can safely ship up to 10 books this way, alternating spines along the staple line. Be sure to use a yard stick or ruler to pre-fold out your lines or you will damage your spines.

Place the comic book(s) face down. You are going to place strips of blue painters tape along the sides. Do not be a “Jerry Smith” and put blue tape over the scotch tape on top flap.

Place 1 strip of tape on each side as pictured below:

If you are super worried about sharp corners and razor sharp sides (attempting to obtain a 9.8 or higher grade) you should definitely tape the corners at a diagonal was well. See below:

Carefully fold over your flaps, checking slowly that there is no bend to the comic book. See method below as pictured:

3 (Three) peices of tape when it’s all closed up carefully. 2 along the top and bottom flap edges and one for good measure in the centerline. See pictured:

Back of Gemini II Mailer. You can see the top and bottom tape flaps over side.

Print your name clearly in black sharpie. Write your email address. Write your phone number too in case there is a problem. Also you should write out the name of the comic book title(s) and issue #. Write clearly and legibly. You are not a doctor.

Okay now set that aside somewhere. Somewhere safe from children, coffee, mountain dew, or anything else might sprinkle on it. We are going to build a box! Get ready. It’s hard. Let’s make sure that box survives the USPS. Use 3-4 pieces on the bottom outer flaps. Use tape to tape in inside bottom flap too.

On the sides, I’ve seen boxes get blown out from stress or other boxes on top. Use tape on that corner seam that’s merely glued. Tape the inside too. Don’t be lazy. Go beyond what’s necessary. After all, you just bought like 25 rolls of clear packing tape, right? Okay then, tape away!

So now I’m going to show you the inside of the box to re-iterate what I was stressing about the corner seam of these boxes. Tape away with all that extra tape, brah.

Sprinkle some magical fairy dust otherwise known as styrofoam peanuts in the bottom of the box, only enough to where you can’t see the bottom. Shipping peanuts is fun to give, but never to receive. So you have that going for you, right?

Place your books with the writing side up and place some remaining packing peanuts on top of the comic. Only enough to which you still have a half inch to an inch of space between the top of the box and the top of the layer of peanuts. You do not want to crush your books with the box flaps because you overstuffed the box with peanuts!

Now you are ready to seal the box up. Place fragile stickers/tape on the corners and bottom of the box. Print out your USPS shipping label from the USPS website and affix it to the top of the box.

Bottom of box:

You have now packaged a box of comics inside a box to be shipped out. Congrats! See? Wasn’t that easy? I hope this guide helps you as it has helped me over the years. I have been selling on ebay since 2010 and I learned slowly over time all of these tips. I’m here to share them all with you on this page.  I’ve had 2 boxes damaged in 10 years.  Pretty good odds!

Thank you!

How to Press Comic Books

I have decided to try and dive into the subculture and rabbit hole known as comic book pressing.   I decided to invest in a  professional grade t-shirt heatpress machine for this adventure. It makes perfect sense because KaptainMyke is already in the business of t-shirt designs and heatpressing silkscreen art.

Edit 9/17/2017 :  Now you can learn and try to press comic books yourself at home! Read my FAQ How to Press Comic Books with a T-Shirt Press by KaptainMyke.

Where to begin? I’ve read and seen countless examples of bad pressing. Scorched books, waves or ripples appear on the comic book several hours or days later. Many times the comic book returns back to its original shape before pressing – like a memory foam mattress!   I am not here to endorse amateur pressing but I am posting here my findings and experiences so far.   Temperature and moisture levels are key.   So what is one to do when water or moisture is paper product’s worst enemy?

I thought I would try the realm of singular heat/cold exchange on pressing. You press a book for 20 minutes, flip the book over for an additional 20 minutes, and turn off the unit…leaving the book inside the press for 4 hours after. This proved to be wildly successful…so here goes my photo documented results with my very first press.

I used one of my son’s new comic books. It’s a brand new Newsstand Edition copy of Scooby Doo Team-up #27, featuring Plastic Man. This comic book is rough! My son is 10 years old and autistic, so he frankly does not care at all what happens to the book, so long as the book is opened to the page he likes the most, and on the floor for him to look at anytime in any random moment of his choosing to admire.

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and creased front corner. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and creased front corner. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and creased front corner. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and creased front corner. Yikes!

I regret I didn’t take enough photos of the back but here are a few good angles for you to inspect:

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and waves on the back cover. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and waves on the back cover. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and waves on the back cover. Yikes!

The first trial comic book pressing: 2017 DC Comics Scooby Doo Team-up ft Plastic Man #27. You can see the wrinkles and waves on the back cover. Yikes!

I used 2 sheets of normal copy paper on top and below the comic book inside the heat press.

I used 2 sheets of normal copy paper on top and below the comic book inside the heat press.

I used 2 sheets of normal copy paper on top and below the comic book inside the heat press.

I used 2 sheets of normal copy paper on top and below the comic book inside the heat press.

I tried an initial temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit for 20 minutes on each side. This seems to be the best temperature but today I am trying 170 degrees.

The trick is to turn off the heat press after the second 20 minutes and leave the comic book inside the heat press for an additional 1-4 hours, depending on the severity of the the initial creasing and waviness of of the book. Leaving the book in the press is crucial if you do not wish to use a sinus cold or clothes fabric humidifier. I do not suggest using humidity on the book. It’s called a “dry press” and “dry cleaning” for a reason. Leaving the book in the press for as long as possible will prevent the book from returning to its original “memory foam mattress” condition.

After 4 hours later, here are the results of the first comic book pressing by KaptainMyke:

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of back cover.

Results of 1st comic press. Front of cover. You can see the crease on the bottom right corner to see it's the same book.

Results of 1st comic press. Front of cover. You can see the crease on the bottom right corner to see it’s the same book.

Results of 1st comic press. Top down left side view of front of book.

Results of 1st comic press. Top down left side view of front of book.

Spine results of first press. You can obviously see the color breaking spine ticks but overall previous damage of spine is nonexistent.

Spine results of first press. You can obviously see the color breaking spine ticks but overall previous damage of spine is nonexistent.

Bottom right front corner of book shows the color breaking corner crease but it is flattened out very smooth and flat.

Bottom right front corner of book shows the color breaking corner crease but it is flattened out very smooth and flat.

Results of first press. Back of book. No damage.

Results of first press. Back of book. No damage.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down left side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down left side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down right side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down right side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down right side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down right side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of back cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of front cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top left side of front cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top right side of front cover.

Results of first press. Back of book. Top down top right side of front cover.

As you can clearly see, for my first trial run of dry heat pressing a comic book, the results are wildly remarkable and astounding.  Total success!  There are a few remaining dings but for my first press this is fantastic.

A few things I’ve learned:
Use copy paper on the top and back of cover for pressing.
Pages with glossy magazine paper will stick together when temp is too hot.
When this happens, wait for book to completely cool down before separating out pages stuck due to modern high gloss paper.
Do not press books with a square bound spine, such as graphic novels like The Dark Knight Returns or The Killing Joke.
Spine rolls are not a problem. The press easily resets spine rolls but you will have color breaks most likely.

The name of the heat press is a VEVOR Digital Controller heatpress machine. Model CP230B. Temperature can be adjusted from 100-400 degrees.  Brand new they can retail for $250-$400.  Used you can buy one for $150 but you will need a new bottom pad most likely.

EDIT:  So CBCS comics suspended my account for 7 days and deleted my post on the forum at forum.cbcscomics.com.  

I guess free information exchange isn’t allowed.   I was also not aware this was against company forum policy since they have not updated their terms of use.  

Amateur pressing should not threaten their business model.  The fascists who operate the discussion forum do, however.   

 

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

VEVOR Headpress Machine. Swivel stand and pressure screws give this heat press total flexibility for various sizes and shapes of books. The pressure plate screws will help adjust for all different sizes and thickness of books.

Here are the results of some more books I’ve recently worked on. I performed a sort of dry cleaning and dry heat pressing on the following books:

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. This one is beat up and has bad spine creasing with color breaks. Before heat pressing.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. This one is beat up and has bad spine creasing with color breaks. Before heat pressing.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. This one is beat up and has bad spine creasing with color breaks. Before heat pressing.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. This one is beat up and has bad spine creasing with color breaks. Before heat pressing.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

1988 DC Comics BATMAN #428 1st Printing NEWSSTAND EDITION. After heat pressing and spine realigment.

Next I tried a cheap newsstand edition of Supergirl from 1994. This one had bad wrinkles and wave in it throughout the entire book. Looks like moisture possibly hit the book. Here are the results:

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. Bad waves, wrinles, and appears to be moisture damage. Before dry cleaning and heatpress.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

1994 DC Comics SUPERGIRL Vol 3 #1 NEWSSTAND EDITION. After dry cleaning and heatpressing. Waves and wrinkles gone. Interior pages are flat and bright white. Back cover is flat and creases gone but color breaks still evident.

So now, you can learn and try to press comic books yourself at home! Read my FAQ How to Press Comic Books with a T-Shirt Press by KaptainMyke.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. BEFORE dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.

1966 Marvel Comics AVENGERS #32. AFTER dry cleaning and heatpress and total spine realignment.